Archive for the ‘architecture’ Category

The Akashi Kaikyō Bridge runs between the city of Akashi* and the island of Awaji and has the “longest central span of any suspension bridge in the world.” (Wikipedia) It’s an engineering marvel and a beautiful bridge. I took these shots from Maiko Park, which is situated just below the point where the bridge leaves […]


Hikone snow

26Nov16

I’m not sure why I’ve been thinking about this trip to Hikone, which took place about four years ago, so much lately. Perhaps it’s because my last two entries both had to do with cherry blossoms and snow always rhymes visually with those white blooms of spring for me. Or perhaps it’s because the temperature […]


Riding the Osaka Wheel takes you up above the Expo 70 Commemorative Park and you end up looking down on Okamoto Taro’s famous Tower of the Sun, the centerpiece of the 1970 World Exposition in Osaka, as if from a helicopter. I’ve already written about the way in which the traces of the Expo can […]


A visit to the Expo 70 Commemoration Park is a visit to the ruins of the future. The 1970 World Expo held in Osaka was one of the last great future-oriented modernist productions held on an international scale. The theme of the Expo was “Progress and Harmony for Mankind,” a vision of a united humanity […]


About a month ago I made my second visit to the Asahi Beer Oyamazaki Villa Museum of Art, which is an architectural treasure and also a very interesting and very intimate museum.  The museum is located in the Yamazaki area of Kyoto Prefecture at the base of Tennozan Hill, which is famous as the location […]


glitchopolis

05Sep13

This series of photographs was shot from the train window between Osaka and Kobe on the Hankyu line using the panorama function on my iPod touch.  The rapid shifting between foreground and background focus points ended up confusing the camera and resulted in these gloriously fragmented views of what would otherwise be a mostly bland […]


Kunio Kato’s beautiful and melancholic Academy Award winning animated short, Tsumiki no Ie (つみきのいえ) — The House of Small Cubes — is a film infused with the sadness of disappearing time.  The source of melancholy seems obvious at first: it’s the classic melancholy of old age in which the gradual erasure of the world one […]



Advertisements